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Finally!! The Spey Booklet is on line for sale

spey-cast-instruction-bookle

This detailed booklet will help Spey casters of any level to better understand the principles of modern Spey casting.

Sorry for the wait, my Spey fishing and casting friends and community. The Spey booklet is now online, in a hard copy and a downloadable PDF will be up shortly as well. here is the link to the page http://speyfishingoregon.com/product/spey-casting-booklet-travis-johnson/ Enjoy

Placing your energy on working hard at anything will always pay out!!!

On to the current Steelhead news. The Deschutes Steelhead fishing has been about the same since we began guiding back in July. Fish hard with an open mind and your chin up and you will find a fish a day. The year of low numbers is not the worst thing as anglers we could have. The ability to go fishing still is present, closed to angling could be way worse. By going fishing you show respect for the rivers that Steelhead live in. By not going you might save a few dollars, but those dollars we put into the love of steelhead are just as important to the communities and the people that have made the chasing of Steelhead their lives. Just food for thought, i know we all care for these fish, hope everyone is getting out on the water!! Thanks

A Heads Up for 2018

Bright Winter fish are what we all dream of catching in the cold wet weather!!!

Just a quick note to all those looking forward to 2018. The Winter Steelhead calendar is open and ready to book. After we all get through another tough summer steelhead season, and get through the heat into a cooler season. The one thing I like about the chasing winter fish, No Damn counts, lol. those who have been emailing and texting shoot over some dates and we will get you locked in! Let’s get you on the water. Enjoy

Parameters of a Spey cast

anchor placement in spey casting

Noticed the anchor placement out in front of the caster and off to the same side of the body the caster is casting off, this is a huge KEY

The need to define the parameters of the casting area is crucial in understanding the fundamentals of spey casting. We all seem to understand the principles of right and left, front and back, except when we put ourselves in a river with an unfamiliar rod. The simplistic idea of these principles is key to understanding placement in the area given to casters during their fishing.

 

By establishing right and left, front and back, we can draw quadrants with the rod in hand. These parameters help us define where the anchor should be placed in relation with each cast and on different sides of the body. They also help us to understand and allow the depth of each cast, how far our D-loop can travel behind us given our casting area.

 

The first parameter is right and left. This is the easiest. We have already set our target line with our upriver foot or hips and shoulders. By placing the Spey rod directly in the center of our sternum and pointing at the target, we can look to the left of the rod and see the left quadrant. We can look to the right and see the right quadrant. The right and left quadrants help us to gather the information we need on placing our anchor, depending on which side of the body we are casting from. For casts made from the right side of the body, all parts of the cast must finish inside the front right quadrant. All casts that come off the left will finish in the front left quadrant.

 

Establishing front and back seems like just as easy a proposition, but in reality, this is where parameters become difficult. Before this, Spey casting has been taught in a two-dimensional manner. We stand with arms and legs shoulder width apart and cast 90 degrees to the flow of current. In reality, that couldn’t be more wrong. We seldom cast at a 90-degree angle to the current, and when we do, we would simply plant our upriver foot, and turn our sternum, at that angle to make sure we achieve it.

 

To teach front and back, I have students place a rod firmly against their shoulders, one end pointed upriver and the other downriver. As we set our target line, we will notice this angle of our shoulders and rod and our front and back change dramatically with the flow of the river. What was once behind us is in front of us when faced at 90 degrees. Some of what was in front of us is now behind us. This optical illusion created by the river and the turning of our torso throws many people off. What may seem different to the has no bearing on the real fundamentals and parameters of the Spey cast.  Maintaining the same anchor and D-loop positions throughout the cast.

Pulling off the perfect spey cast

We can see very plainly the anchor and line are again on the same side as the cast is coming off and well in front of the caster, perfect position. Also notice the shoulders and body angle produced by rotating not pulling the line around.

By keeping our anchor in front of our front line and not letting it drift back behind, us we can achieve more powerful casts by letting the line pull the anchor from the river. If we let the anchor land or drift behind us, the rod and our physical strength are what we use to cast a line. This is what I describe as the difference between casting and throwing. When you cast a line, it pulls itself from the water. When you “throw” a line, you physically remove it from the water.

 

Another thing you can learn easily by placing anchor in front of the line or behind the line is how our loops and lines react to what is happening. When we can keep our anchor in front of the front line and in the correct quadrant, we will notice we can form a far more dynamic loop. When the anchor drifts back behind us, it’s hard to keep a wedge-shaped loop. The loop opens up, becomes extremely wind resistant, and loses much speed. On the other hand, the farther back we place our anchor behind the line, the further back our “D” loop or  back cast goes, and the chances of catching some streamside vegetation become greater. So controlling the depth of the “D” loop is another bonus of correct anchor placement. This allows the angler to fish more places with more consistency.

This aerial view of the anchor and forward stroke shows even in tight quarters these principles apply, maybe more so.

The last thing I would like to reference in these ideas is the rules of the parameters are applicable regardless of line style and Dominate hand or cack-handed placement. I feel that these are of up most importance to the caster and the nature of the cast themselves. I have noticed many times that correct and well executed action promoted more correct positions and actions and together make can produce a wonderful result. At the same end the casts the start bad usually don’t get better as the casting sequence is followed through, every now and then I am surprised by a result here and there, but for the most part bad positions and actions lead to more bad and incorrect positions and actions. Learn and ingrain the correct actions and you will get results