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2019 About Time

Here we are a couple week into 2019. The government is shut down. The holiday burn is finally over. The weather has been, well the weather. Winter Steelhead are being themselves. Tough to find elusive and rewarding. If you have not been out you should. It is way harder to catch Steelhead from the couch than from the river.

Organize your fishing stuff now and have a better season.

If your still looking to get out, make sure you go through all you necessary items before getting to the river. Number 1 so you know where it is when needed. Number 2 to make sure it is not out or low. Things like tippet, sink tips, and the working fly.

Tailing a Steelhead in last years Deschutes Spey School.

now I have spent the last year very busy and this fall/winter busy as well. I will start blogging again on a weekly/bi-weekly basis. As for now, here are some new things to come. This year again I will be doing the 3 day Spey School on the Deschutes. This will happen the last week of July. Second I will be doing a similar Spey school about fishing sink tips and deep flies in November. Lastly dates are not set  but sometime in the first 2 weeks of April a  competition Spey clinic at the Moreland ponds , date TBA.

Trying to tame a monster!!!

I have another big thing happening here in the next few weeks, so stay tuned to see!!!! Lastly, I have one open spot on my Costa Rica tarpon trip… if anyone is interested please contact me!! Thanks tight lines and talk soon.

 

TJ

A Tip on Tips, and a Line on Lines

A fresh chrome winter steelhead taken on a full floating Skagit and light tip, directly behind someone fishing a multi-density Skagit line

Well my winter steelhead season is not done but we are well past the half way mark. I watched a lot of fishing for winter steelhead over the past 4 months. Saw some thing and made notes about the things I saw. On top of that I always keep a running tally of the fish and some stats the surround that’s the fish hooked. I would like to share my finding with you.

Meaty buck taken in shallow water on a light tip and floating skagit

Let start with what I see as a full time steelhead guide. I see that most anglers try to show up with and be the most prepared they can, this is very appreciated. Most of them have rods less than 2 years old and the news years model of lines, I would say 80% of them almost make it a point. I also see a wider selection in most anglers sink tip wallets. A range of T-11 to T-17 and sprinkle in a T-8 or old type 3. All good things to have.

Now here is where I see people either uneducated or not fully understanding what they are trying to accomplish. The new wave of Skagit lines seems to be multi-density lines where the front portion of the actual Skagit head sinks and then gets progressively lighter and at some point as you go back down the line reverts into a floating line. The sinking portion of these lines is anywhere from 8-15’. Now I have zero problems with these lines, I have more problems with how they are applied.

Knowing more about the rivers you fish in regards to flow and fishable pieces of water.

Now this is where I want to help you as anglers. I want to help you to understand the need and use of these types of lines. The thought process in using and purchasing theses types of lines is to either get deeper or slow the fly down by getting more sinking material below the quick surface current. Now on the river I guide deep is a relatively term. But if you want depth on the urban rivers of the greater PDX area then in my opinion you need be very selective of the runs you fish with very heavy tips and flies. On the other hand if your goal is to get the fly speed as slow as possible. Here is where is have seen the anglers gone a bit off. If your a guy who is after a slower fly then you can’t fish the same tip as if you are trying to get the fly deep. So if you want deep have a tip for that, if you want slow have a tip for that. It you want deep and slow…. have a piece of water for that!! With a line that sinks the tip below the surface current if you use the same tip you would on your floating Skagit line your most likely going to be too deep. For the sake of your next line purchase… have a plan for what your trying to accomplish with the equipment your buy.

Now the stats… 7 steelhead landed on floating Skagit lines behind their fishing partner using multi-density lines. On average the heavier setup lots 3 more flies a day… and I believe these lines can be an effective part of an anglers arsenal. But use them with a purpose!! Have fun and get on the water!!!

Lots going on in 2018

Getting bent on winter Chrome!!

Welcome to 2018, hope everyone has been getting out and trying to find a fish or two. I have been working hard at finishing up a few up and coming things, and just got back from my week of instructing in San Francisco. I had gotten out a couple times but will be in full guide mode as we speak.

This big Redside could not resist a well presented Norm Woods.

This year has been busy already and want to talk more about so things that are coming up this season. My winter schedule has only a few open dates, so if you want to get out on the water contact me now. The second thing is trout season is only a few months out and dates are filling up fast for the salmon fly hatch. Seems like I get lots of last minute requests and can’t fill them all. So let’s talk earlier this year and get you on the water!!

This nice Redfish has to eat my popper!! These trips are great fun and an awesome saltwater sight fishing experience!!! New dates for this fall will be up soon.

A new newsletter format will be happing on the website. I will be sending out a quarterly newsletter. I hope to start adding video clips and trip ideas as long as a few helpful fishing ideas. Will give readers better scheduling ideas and hosted trip through the year with AWA.
Lastly the Spey casting film is so close to done!!! Hang in there not long now!!!